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Roles and Responsibilities in Research

Laboratory Personnel

The Laboratory Safety Manager is a senior researcher appointed by the PI or is the PI him/herself, who is responsible for all safety aspects of the laboratory's operations. The Laboratory Safety Manager is responsible for:

  1. Holding a CoF for Supervising Chemical Laboratories (C-14). Another individual may be designated to obtain the CoF which can be obtained by passing a test administered by EH&S, as authorized by FDNY.
  2. Working with the PI and EH&S to ensure laboratory personnel are informed of and follow this Manual, its applicable Plans, including the LATCH, and all University, school, departmental and laboratory policies and procedures. Ensuring laboratory personnel conduct activities consistent with good laboratory practices.
  3. Ensuring that appropriate PPE is available and used.
  4. Ensuring that appropriate spill control material is available and personnel are trained in its use.
  5. Ensuring that Safety Data Sheets (SDS) are accessible for all hazardous chemicals in use or storage.
  6. Instructing laboratory personnel on specific procedures and equipment.
  7. Ensuring that chemical containers are properly labeled and closed.
  8. Ensuring that chemical inventory is prepared, maintained and accessible, either on paper or electronically (e.g., ChemTracker).
  9. Monitoring the procurement, use, and disposal of hazardous substances.
  10. Advising Facilities personnel of potential hazards that might be encountered when they enter the laboratory.

Laboratory Personnel are individuals who work in the laboratory including PIs, research scientists, post-doctoral fellows, technicians, undergraduate and graduate students, visiting scientists, laboratory volunteers, support personnel, and glassware washers. All laboratory personnel are responsible for:

  1. Reviewing and applying the information in this Manual, its applicable Plans, including the LATCH, and all University, school, departmental and laboratory policies and procedures.
  2. Knowing where SDS's are maintained and reviewing SDS's prior to use of hazardous substances.
  3. Attending Laboratory Safety, Chemical Hygiene and Hazardous Waste Management Training and other applicable trainings.
  4. Safely handling and disposing of chemicals.
  5. Using appropriate engineering controls (e.g., biological safety cabinet, chemical fume hood, radiation shielding) and PPE when working in the laboratory.
  6. Reviewing and understanding emergency response procedures.

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